Create an account

By clicking “Create your account”, you agree to our
terms of service and privacy policy

Or sign up using

Login

Or sign in using

Reset password

3. Anti-Sicilian with 2.Nc3 d6 (Part 1)

3. Anti-Sicilian with 2.Nc3 d6 (Part 1)

Why play the Anti-Sicilian with 2.Nc3?

Imagine preparing the mainline, starting with 3.d4 Open Sicilian. You’d have to prepare against a minimum of 7 lines like the Najdorf, Dragon, Classical, Scheveningen, etc., each with its separate theory. 

At the very least, it would take you a few months to prepare and remember those lines! Also, because the theory is sharp, almost anybody with computer skills can cook up a dangerous line with Black and use it against you.

On the other hand, you could save time by preparing sidelines like 2.d4, 2.f4, 2.d3 but forget about fighting for an opening advantage.

That’s why our GMs have offered the Closed Sicilian with 2.Nc3. It's easier to prepare compared to the mainline and you still have more than great chances to fight for an opening advantage

Against 2...d6, which is Black's 2nd most popular reply, the Grand Prix Attack offers great attacking chances. 

Below, you can see some of the positions from the video course. 

Anti-Sicilian, ChessMood coursesAnti-Sicilian, ChessMood coursesAnti-Sicilian, ChessMood coursesAnti-Sicilian, ChessMood coursesAnti-Sicilian, ChessMood coursesAnti-Sicilian, ChessMood coursesAnti-Sicilian, ChessMood coursesAnti-Sicilian, ChessMood courses

Many of our students have had excellent results in this line, often crushing stronger players in the opening itself!

Also, our GMs have tested these lines with engines, and the repertoire will serve you well even against titled players.

Let’s jump in!

Additional Resources: This is the 1st Part of the Anti-Sicilian series, Black’s 2…d6 move. Once you finish it, please watch the 2nd Part, which covers 2.Nc3 Nc6.

What you'll learn

  • A step-by-step guide to playing the Grand Prix Attack with 3.f4! against 2…d6, covering the key ideas, variations, and improvements.
  • How Black can get crushed within the first 25 moves if they don’t know the right way to continue. 
  • Model games to help you understand this line better.
  • How to carry out a swift attack, right from building it with maneuvers to finishing off the game with sacrifices!

Lesson Plan

40 episode(s) 2 hours 35 min
5

Students give this course an average of 5 out of 5 stars.

Avetik Grigoryan
Avetik Grigoryan
Great!
Great!
Erik-Hakobyan ErikHakobyan
Erik-Hakobyan ErikHakobyan
David Hakhinyan
David Hakhinyan
Vahe Suqiasyan
Vahe Suqiasyan
Ovi S
Ovi S
Thank you for a terrific course Avetik!
Thank you for a terrific course Avetik!
Giorgos Kechagias
Giorgos Kechagias
Kevin M
Kevin M
Avetik is very talented at making complex concepts very understandable.
Avetik is very talented at making complex concepts very understandable.
Md Bashiq Imrose
Md Bashiq Imrose
skipper chess
skipper chess
Love it!
Love it!
WIM_Siranush Ghukasyan
WIM_Siranush Ghukasyan
Christian Eriksson
Christian Eriksson
Sidharth Sreekumar
Sidharth Sreekumar
Great Course!
Great Course!
Suren Ghazaryan
Suren Ghazaryan
Satish Nair
Satish Nair
Great course. Have been looking for something like this for ever!!!!
Great course. Have been looking for something like this for ever!!!!
Vishnu Warrier
Vishnu Warrier
In the last advanced section video 8...e6 at minute 1:00 in the video where Black has just played 10...dxe5, in the main video course you did cover this move earlier where you recommended 11. Bxc5 by White. However in the advanced video course you give the line 11. fxe5 by White, which is why you recommended the change to 10. Bb5 to avoid this. Is the 11. Bxc5 move instead playable?
In the last advanced section video 8...e6 at minute 1:00 in the video where Black has just played 10...dxe5, in the main video course you did cover this move earlier where you recommended 11. Bxc5 by White. However in the advanced video course you give the line 11. fxe5 by White, which is why you recommended the change to 10. Bb5 to avoid this. Is the 11. Bxc5 move instead playable?
Aida Alvanjyan
Aida Alvanjyan
siddharth sarma
siddharth sarma
Jason chen
Jason chen
Great Course. I have one question in Section1 8....e6 line. After White played Be3. Can Black play d5 instead of b6? We probably end with R vs B+2P or B vs 2P middlegame. How can I judge the position. As opponent will have pair bishop. Thanks for answering in advance
Great Course. I have one question in Section1 8....e6 line. After White played Be3. Can Black play d5 instead of b6? We probably end with R vs B+2P or B vs 2P middlegame. How can I judge the position. As opponent will have pair bishop. Thanks for answering in advance
GM Avetik Grigoryan
GM Avetik Grigoryan

After having a successful playing career where he became the Armenian Champion in 2010, GM Avetik Grigoryan found his passion for chess coaching and switched to it full-time. 

Since then, he has guided many ambitious players to become Grandmasters and International Masters and has over 10 years of coaching experience.

He believes anyone can improve at chess, with the right mood and proper direction. And with that vision, he founded ChessMood in 2018.

After having a successful playing career where he became the Armenian Champion in 2010, GM Avetik Grigoryan found his passion for chess coaching and switched to it full-time. 

Since then, he has guided many ambitious players to become Grandmasters and International Masters and has over 10 years of coaching experience.

He believes anyone can improve at chess, with the right mood and proper direction. And with that vision, he founded ChessMood in 2018.

The Anti-Sicilian with 2.Nc3 is a respectable alternative to the Sicilian Defense. You need to prepare far less here than the mainline while still having excellent chances to fight for an advantage.

In Part 1 of the Anti-Sicilian course, we cover the line that arises after 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6. White has many respectable options here with 3.g3, 3.f4, 3.Bb5+. 

We recommend playing the Grand Prix Attack with 3.f4! which leads to some aggressive opening positions.

History of the Sicilian Grand Prix Attack

The opening was employed by GM Hebden Hodgson and FM Rumens in the English Grand Prix tournaments with great results. That’s where the name ‘Grand Prix’ comes from.

However, the first game in the opening, with the move order 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6 3.f4, was played between Soviet players Vasily Panov - Vitaly Chekhover in Moscow, 1936.

White’s idea in the Sicilian Grand Prix Attack

White wants to complete their kingside development and launch a swift attack on the Black king. 

White follows up with Nf3, Bc4(or Bb5), 0-0 and d3. Later, they can launch a kingside attack with Qe1-Qh4 and open up their c1-bishop with f5. 

Black can get into a difficult position if they don’t know the theory. Even if Black plays the best moves, the resulting position is full of fight with chances for both sides.

Is the Grand Prix Attack sound?

The GrandPrix Attack is a sound and aggressive opening that has been employed by top players like Vishwanathan Anand, Nigel Short and Gwain Jones. It’s a good alternative to use against the Sicilian Defense.

Course 40 episodes (2 hours 35 min)
Creators GM Avetik Grigoryan
Share this facebook twitter linkedin
Take a quiz

Unlock access to this course!

Did you know you can unlock access to ALL of our courses with one of our plans?

Unlock access to this course!

Choose your plan to access this course.

We use cookies to make ChessMood's website a better place. Cookies help to provide a more personalized experience, and web analytics for us. To learn more about the different cookies we're using, check out our Cookie policy.