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Benjamin Katz

Benjamin Katz 10 months ago

Anti-Sicilian Part 3 question. 3....Nc6.

Hi Coach!

I recently faced the following line on chess.com

e4 c5

Nc3 e6

f4 Nc6?! 

I wasn't able to find this 3... Nc6 move in the material, it seems like a combination of several of the other lines. Can you (or anyone in the community) please confirm what to play against this?

Thanks!

1068
18
REPLY
Mogens Nielsen

Mogens Nielsen 10 months ago

After 4.Sf3 it should transpose to something known. 4...d5 or4...d6 we can play Bb5. And after 4...a6, 5.g3.  
REPLY
WIM_Siranush Ghukasyan

WIM_Siranush Ghukasyan 10 months ago

I've watched only 1 and 2 parts of Antisicilians, I will try to answer after watching others too. I think somehow it should be transposed one of the positions. 
WIM_Susanna Gaboyan

WIM_Susanna Gaboyan 10 months ago

I didn't watch it yet, but I guess it has to be transpose.
GM Hovhannes Gabuzyan

GM Hovhannes Gabuzyan 10 months ago

Hi Benjamin!

You can be playing with 4.Nf3 as @Mogens_Nielsen mentioned it will be a transposition.

REPLY
Benjamin Katz

Benjamin Katz 10 months ago

Thank you all! Really appreciate the responses, this makes a lot of sense to me.
Andrzej Krzywda

Andrzej Krzywda 8 months ago

Where exactly can I find the transposition lines?

It seems to me that 4. Nf3 allows several options for Black:

- d5

- Nge7

- a6

- Nf6

It's not clear to me how to follow in those lines. The Nge7 line bothers me the most, as Black can end with the Anti Grand Prix setup not allowing doubling the pawns on c6. Should we switch to d4 plan in this case?

Yair E

Yair E 8 months ago

@Andrzej_Krzywda - Nge7 indeed would render Bb5 pointless. I would say in such a case switch to the Closed Sicilian by playing g3.

Andrzej Krzywda

Andrzej Krzywda 8 months ago

@Yair_E Thank you. Yes, it's an option. But I feel it's not something that we want here - Black can get his normal e6, g6 setup without any downsides.

Yair E

Yair E 8 months ago

@Andrzej_Krzywda I agree, but I believe that's actually the current CM advice for cases like this when normal GP set-up doesn't really work. In fact, there are various ways black can move-order white into a situation where the closed Sicilian would be our main option, but with the Nh3 unavailable as we've already played the knight to f3. I find this happens to me quite often, and I also feel black can easily get a quite playable position this way. I would really be happy to hear the opinion of @GM_Hovhannes_Gabuzyan on this one! :) We do have some interesting plans in the course, like playing h3, g4 and getting the knight to g3, but black also has posibilities on the queen's side and in the center. Maybe some additional video going more in depth on the whole topic of the Closed Sicilian as white, and countering black's play, would be possible at some point.

GM Hovhannes Gabuzyan

GM Hovhannes Gabuzyan 8 months ago

@Yair_E Can you please provide a concrete move order so I can answer?)

Yair E

Yair E 8 months ago

Thank you, @GM_Hovhannes_Gabuzyan! Please see the attached. I included a few lines, but all are aiming for the set-up with black pawns on a6, b5 and e6, basically a Kan set-up. I really get variations of this a lot.

My point is that there are many ways for black to move order us into a situation where we've already commited to f2-f4 and thus the Nh3 plan of the Closed Sicilian is no longer feasible. Yes, we have the h2-h3, g2-g3-g4 plan, but black also has promising play on the queen side and even in the center. 

David Flynn

David Flynn 8 months ago

Reminds me of another move order trick:

1. e4 e6 2. d4 (French?) c5 (nope, sicilian) and now you've committed to d4.

which you can decide to play an Open Sicilian (Nf3), Benoni type position (d5) or c3 Sicilian / French Tarrasch IQP (c3 / Nd2) - none of which are in the repertoire, but the c3 Sicilian / French Tarrasch is played similar to the c5 lines in the Schlecter French where the cost of c3 is no worse than the cost of Bd3 and scores well at club level - you could probably transpose it though Bb5+ is likely to be more useful than Bd3.

GM Hovhannes Gabuzyan

GM Hovhannes Gabuzyan 8 months ago

Hi David, 

In this case D5 is a good move because in Benoni white has played pawn c4 but here it can be avoided and white can just play Nc3 with a better position after d5.

Chessmood Odysseus

Chessmood Odysseus 8 months ago

We talked about this too during our GMs meeting and of course, there are many possible transpositions to our opening and some move orders can be strange to meet the first time. That said we always try to stir the situation towards a familiar battlefield. Our piece deployment should be consistent and we must be comfortable with the positions that we will reach. I just put together some initial moves where you can see that we always aim for the same and there are many possibilities that you should try and investigate by yourselves too. Find the position that you have more feeling for...
Nils Philipp

Nils Philipp 8 months ago

Thank you. That is very helpful. In the closed tournament I played Nf3 to much on autopilot, not considering a later Nh3:

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 e6 3. f4 a6 4. Nf3 - against "acye" and Sharan.

In our second game "acye" even tries a very aggressive plan on the kingside: 

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 e6 3. f4 a6 4. Nf3 b5 5. d3 Bb7 6. g3 h5!?

Looking forward to the webinar on Friday!

David Flynn

David Flynn 8 months ago

Asked a question about h5 today in the 2... a6 lines (the difference being the knight going to h3 there).
Nils Philipp

Nils Philipp 8 months ago

@ David: And it seems that in the 2. ... a6 course f2-f4 is played later if at all. While we respond to 2. ... e6 with 3. f4. 
Kevin D

Kevin D 8 months ago

Since we already play: 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 a6 3.g3 b5 4.Bg2 Bb7 5.d3 e6 6.Nh3 d6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.f4 Be7 Perhaps we could consider exploring on our own the positions arising after 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 e6 3.g3 which can also lead to interesting play. For instance 3...d5 4.exd5 exd5 5.d4 cxd4 6.Qxd4 Nf6 7.Bg5 Be7 8.Bb5+ Nc6 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.Qc5 Bxc3+ 11.bxc3 Qe7+ 12.Qxe7+ Kxe7 13.0-0-0 Be6 Does anyone recognise this position?

Remarkably here is another route via the Vienna Game: 1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.g3 c6 4.d4 exd4 5.Qxd4 d5 6.Bg5 Be7 7.exd5 cxd5 8.Bb5+ Nc6 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.Qc5

The most well known move-order though is seen after: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.c3 d5 5.exd5 Qxd5 6.cxd4 Bg4 7.Nc3 Bb4 8.Be2 Bxf3 9.Bxf3 Qc4 We have arrived at the most widely recommended antidote to the Goring & Danish Gambit, albeit with colors reversed and without the extra move g3 thrown in, which was introduced into tournament praxis I believe by none other than the great Jose Raul Capablanca himself. 

Once again we see the power of not only recognising move orders and transpositions, but also utilising them to our advantage to confuse and trip up unsuspecting opponents. Even strong GM's are not always immune from the effects of such devious play and can easily find themselves in positions they had no intention of entering. 'Move-ordering' opponents is an underrated  but immensely valuable skill to master and is often used by strong players to score easy points, so pay close attention to this aspect of your game: