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Is it fine to spend 1 hour on calculation?

ChessMood Family!
Today I got an interesting question:
"Is it fine is for solving some complicated position, to spend 1 hour? It's time I needed to solve it and find the right moves, but during the real game, I can't spend so much time. What to do?"

A very good question, that many of you have in your mind or have asked me before. So here is my answer.

Yeah, that's right. During the game, you can't spend 1 hour.

When you solve such puzzles, it's basically training for you.

There are positions, that I use with my Grandmaster students, solving which they need 2-3 hours.

But the reason is that it's just training.

You develop your calculation skills, visualization, and others.

I use two kind of excrecies: practical ones, and position like the mentioned, during which students will just develop his calculation skills.

The final advice:No worries if you spend on some calculation too much time. It was good training for you and during your real games, you'll spend less time.

As General Suvorov said: Harder before, easier during the battle.

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REPLY
Abhi yadav

Abhi yadav 1 month ago

Wow, that's super advice. I thought it's not good to spend 30 mins on a position but you opened my eyes. Now I will follow same path.  GM_Avetik Grigoryan

Sriram M

Sriram M 1 month ago

Fully agree with Coach Avetik on this one, practice hard so it becomes effortless in actual game situations.
REPLY
Kevin D

Kevin D 1 month ago

Solving Puzzles is good for building your Mental Red Flag database. During a game, especially a sharp one, if you do not experience a 'Red Flag' moment it means your training is missing something. I define a Red Flag moment, as the moment in a game when the position in front of you triggers your intuition that the time is right to exploit some concrete factor. For example the opponent may have an undefended piece, as GM John Nunn put it LPDO [Loose Pieces Drop Off]; The opponents back rank maybe weak; Opponents king may lack defenders; Opponents position may lack harmony; Opponent maybe way behind in development; all these factors are 'Red Flags' that tell you that something might be there to exploit tactically and to investigate further. 

Without Red Flag moments, tactics tend to pass you by.