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Khokan De

Khokan De 10 months ago

Anyone Who Plays the KID?

Anyone Who Plays the KID?

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REPLY
Sidharth Sreekumar

Sidharth Sreekumar 10 months ago

Me.
Devansh Shah

Devansh Shah 10 months ago

me too !

Sergio Carrera

Sergio Carrera 10 months ago

I just play against it ;-) (Bayonnet Attack)
Kevin D

Kevin D 10 months ago

The King's Indian is my obsession, it's a fascinating Opening that still even baffles the engines. Lately there is a line that many KID specialists are employing and advocating against the Saemisch, and it goes: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 0-0 6.Be3 a6 7.Nge2 Nbd7 8.Qd2 b5 [For more details you can check out the following link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhEtEgaI8Q8 ]



REPLY
Kevin D

Kevin D 10 months ago

The above line is lots of fun for Black and many Saemisch players still get caught out with it, however before you get too excited I have discovered a small wrinkle. That wrinkle involves the ever important move-order [see my forum post on the topic] question, that is, how do we reach our desired setup?

I first became aware of this a6, Nbd7 setup back in 2009 when I was searching for an alternative as Black to the following well established Pawn Sac line which goes: 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 0-0 6.Be3 c5! This variation is sound and has an excellent reputation for Black, but some of the lines are very forcing and drawish, which is not always what you want when facing weaker opposition or need to win. The setup with a6, Nbd7 was recommended by renowned theoretician GM Victor Bologan in his 2009  King's Indian DVD for Chessbase, and the system served me well around that time, with one of my favorite inspirational reference games being the following Gem [Black to play in the diagram]: 



Kevin D

Kevin D 10 months ago

The above was a nice illustration of what is possible in the KID, especially in the hands of one of the greatest attacking Genius in chess history. However back to the topic at hand and the potential fly in the ointment:  1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 0-0 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2! Nbd7 8.0-0-0! b5 9.e5! This position has only been reached in a small number of games featuring strong White players, but I think it comes very close to refuting this entire setup with a6, Nbd7. According to my analysis this setup is only viable for Black when White commits to an early Nge2, fortunately for KID players 6.Nge2 or 7.Nge2 are the most popular moves :-D 

Devansh Shah

Devansh Shah 10 months ago

Wonderful !! @Kevin D
Khokan De

Khokan De 10 months ago

Nice idea! I didn't know this direct b5 pawn sac. I used to play the Nc6 variation, but this idea seems great!
Khokan De

Khokan De 10 months ago

I got an idea. As I play 6...Nc6 it would be more tricky to play 6...a6! 7.Qd2 [Tricky because 7.Nge2 Nbd7! preventing all kinds of c5 for white and transposing to the posted game after 8.Qd2 b5!] 7...Nc6 8.Nge2 [ 8.0-0-0 b5!? unclear] Rb8 transposed to the mainline 6...Nc6

As you can see slight move order changes the whole situation in the KID!

Do you agree with me?

Giorgos Kechagias

Giorgos Kechagias 10 months ago

Μy main repertoire against 1. d4 is: 

1. Benko Gambit / Modern Benoni for a win

2. King's Indian defence

3. Grünfeld defence which is an opening that works very well in my level. 

Kevin D

Kevin D 10 months ago

@Giorgos_Kechagias 

That's a lot of homework. :)

Robert A

Robert A 10 months ago

ok